System Progress Data Reporting

This interactive online platform reports national performance data for organ donation and transplantation in Canada. The dashboard consists of nine primary sections presenting data on key aspects of the donation and transplantation across the system. The data presented here are results as of Dec. 31, 2020.

2020 System Progress Data Dashboard

 

Data highlights from 2020

In 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic affected all aspects of healthcare around the world, Canada’s performance in terms of deceased organ donation and transplantation experienced a reduction when compared to the previous year’s results. At 19.3 donors per million population (dpmp), we remain close to reaching our target of 22 dpmp. Similarly, national living donation rates decreased over last year. In 2020, a total of 276 Canadians died while waiting for a suitable organ transplant opportunity. 

  • In 2020, the generous gifts of 1,221 organ donors and their families saved or improved the lives of 2,662 Canadian patients
  • There were 11% fewer deceased donors in 2020 as compared with the previous year, with Canada’s national deceased donation rate decreasing from 21.9 donors per million population (dpmp) in 2019 to 19.3 dpmp in 2020.
  • There were 21% fewer living organ donors in 2020 as compared with the previous year, with Canada’s national living donation rate decreasing from 16.3 donors per million population (dpmp) in 2019 to 12.8 dpmp in 2020.
  • In 2020, in Canada, there were 734 deceased organ donors and 487 living organ donors
  • In 2020, 276 Canadians died while waiting for a transplant, up from 250 in 2019.
  • Canada still has a shortage of organs, with 4,129 patients waiting for transplants at year’s end 2020. 

The results reflected within this data represent the individual and collective work of both the provincial programs and the national efforts led by Canadian Blood Services. Most importantly, we sincerely acknowledge the generosity of the 1,221 organ donors and their families who gave so selflessly in 2020. We also recognize the heartfelt appreciation of the recipients whose lives were saved or changed through the generous act of donation.  For data related to eye and tissue donation and transplantation in Canada, click here.

COVID-19 impacts on system performance in 2020

It goes without saying that the COVID-19 pandemic affected almost all aspects of the Canadian health system, as well as those of other countries around the world. Organ donation and transplantation was no exception, as the network of healthcare professionals involved in this field attempted to rapidly develop strategies to balance patients’ need for lifesaving and life-improving transplants with the potential risks posed by a novel respiratory illness.

When COVID-19 cases began emerging in Canada in early 2020, organ transplantation activity was generally curtailed at a national level, with almost all programs implementing precautionary measures to address this new potential threat to patient health during the first wave. This culminated in most organ transplant programs suspending or modifying their operations, including living donor transplant procedures being essentially suspended nation-wide for more than a month in the spring of 2020.

Further research emerged about the nature and extent of the risks posed by COVID-19 and the measures required to manage that risk in order to perform organ transplantation procedures in a safe and effective manner. This enabled organ donation and transplantation activity to generally resume in the summer of 2020 at a level that approximated historical performance, with subsequent waves of COVID-19 case prevalence having less of an impact on system activity at a national level.

The impact of the changes in program activity in response to the pandemic is evident in the results for the 2020 calendar year, including an 11 per cent reduction in deceased donation and a 21 per cent reduction in living donation relative to the previous year, as well as a consequent 14 per cent reduction in transplants performed. Nevertheless, it would be inaccurate to interpret these results as reflecting negatively on system performance; on the contrary, our ability as a nation to adapt to uncertain conditions in a manner that ensured the health and well-being of Canadian patients, as well as healthcare personnel, to safely perform at the observed level despite these conditions is a testament to the effectiveness of the donation and transplantation system in Canada, and represents something we can take great pride in as a nation.

The success that this represents can be contextualized when looking at the equivalent reductions in donation and transplantation activity internationally; for example, while the rate of deceased donors per million population in Canada decreased by 11.7 per cent in 2020 relative to the previous year, this is on par with Australia which saw a 10.4 per cent decrease in its deceased donation rate, and reflects a considerably smaller decrease than was seen in the UK (24.9%) and in the world-leader in deceased donation, Spain, which experienced a 23.5 per cent decrease in its deceased donation rate. Moreover, many donation and transplantation programs within Canada were able to achieve results that were consistent with, or even exceeded, previous years, with Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and the Atlantic region seeing the same number or more utilized organ donors in 2020 than the previous year, and living donor liver transplantation activity in 2020 exceeding 2019 results at a national level.

Canadian Blood Services played a meaningful role in achieving these successes by serving as a national conduit for information sharing throughout 2020 and into the following year. These contributions included systematic scans of international best-practice guidelines and emerging research, national consensus guidance, as well as near-real-time data collection and reporting on program operational statuses and activity. Canadian Blood Services provided visibility to critical national and international information that informed the decisions made by the organ donation and transplantation community and functioned as the hub for disseminating this information, as well as providing opportunities for peer-to-peer information exchanges to share research results and expertise from across Canada and around the world.


Acknowledgements 

This data report acknowledges the generous gift made by organ and tissue donors, both living and deceased, and the families of those who have donated. The report further acknowledges the hopes of patients with end-stage organ failure and the dedication of healthcare teams and practitioners throughout the health care system who make it possible to fulfill and increase opportunities for organ and tissue donation and transplantation. This report was made possible through the collective effort and input from members of Canadian Blood Services’ Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Committees, the Canadian Institute for Health Information, and the Information Management team with Canadian Blood Services’ Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation department.

 


Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation System Progress Data, 2019

This interactive online platform reports national performance data for organ donation and transplantation in Canada. The dashboard consists of nine primary sections presenting data on key aspects of the donation and transplantation across the system.The data presented are results as of Dec. 31, 2019. This format replaces our previous annual System Progress Report publication.

 

Data highlights from 2019

  • In 2019, the generous gifts of 1,436 organ donors and their families saved or improved the lives of 3,053 Canadian patients
  • There were 8% more deceased donors in 2019 as compared with the previous year, with Canada’s national deceased donation rate increasing from 20.6 donors per million population (dpmp) in 2018 to 21.9 dpmp in 2019.
  • There were 11% more living organ donors in 2019 as compared with the previous year, with Canada’s national living donation rate increasing from 15.0 donors per million population (dpmp) in 2018 to 16.3 dpmp in 2019.
  • In 2019, in Canada, there were 822 deceased organ donors and 614 living organ donors
  • In 2019, 250 Canadians died while waiting for a transplant, up from 223 in 2018.
  • Canada still has a shortage of organs, with 4,419 patients waiting for transplants at year’s end 2019. 

For data related to eye and tissue donation and transplantation in Canada, click here.


Previous OTDT System Progress Reports (2006-2018)

Further reading

Key elements of a high-performing deceased donation system

Key elements of a high-performing deceased donation system Through experience gained provincially, nationally and internationally it is generally accepted that fundamental key components to a high performing deceased donation system exist, and when implemented, lead to improved performance. These foundational elements include adequate resources and infrastructure, availability of highly trained front-line specialists, leading practice guidelines and professional education, data and analytics to inform system and performance improvement including death audits and the identification of missed donation opportunities, adequate legislation (including mandatory referral), and the presence of appropriate accountability tools and structures. A comprehensive description of each element is provided here.

foundational elements of a high preforming deceased donation system

Another fundamental component of a high-performing system is adequate public education and awareness. Organ donation and transplantation is complex and not well understood. There are many misconceptions that contribute to barriers to registering intent to donate. Increasing awareness for organ and tissue donation and transplantation, and increasing the number of registered organ donors, is part of a comprehensive system-wide approach to increasing donation rates.