Transfusion medicine

Recent Updates

Modified on: 
May 21, 2021

Key Points

  • Severe allergic or anaphylactic reactions are reported in 1.2 to 5.9 per 100,000 components transfused. The most recent Canadian Blood Services surveillance data on allergic reactions is available in the annual surveillance report.
  • There are various mechanisms that can lead to anaphylactic or severe allergic reactions, and some may not be preventable despite product modification.
  • Even in the presence of low anti-IgA level and anti-IgA antibodies, risk of anaphylactic transfusion is low.
  • Anti-IgA testing is only recommended in selected individuals with history of one anaphylactic transfusion reaction or two severe allergic transfusion reactions.
  • The form for ordering anti-IgA testing can be found on the Canadian Blood Services website.
  • Instructions and guidance on how to report adverse transfusion reactions can be found in this guide on the Canadian Blood Services Professional Education website.
Transfusion
Modified on: 
May 20, 2021

http://cancovid19plasma.ca/This repository aims to support Canadian transfusion medicine health care professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic. It will be updated regularly as new information is available. In addition, the public and donors can learn more about how Canadian Blood Services is responding to COVID-19 by visiting blood.ca/covid-19.

Transfusion
Published: 
Apr 21, 2021
Chapter 16

This chapter focuses on preoperative autologous donation (PAD). PAD refers to the donation of blood by a patient for their own future use; generally, this is for a scheduled elective surgery. The top three procedures associated with a request for a PAD are total hip replacement, total knee replacement and hysterectomy.1

There are other types of autologous blood use (e.g., acute normovolemic hemodilution and intraoperative and postoperative blood salvage) which are not discussed in this chapter.

Autologous and directed donations should be confined to circumstances of rare blood types2 or plasma protein deficiencies in which allogeneic blood components may not meet patient needs. In all other cases, allogeneic blood transfusions are a safe option. See Chapter 13 of this Guide for more information on directed donations for neonatal and pediatric transfusion.

Transfusion

Upcoming Events

When
June 22, 2021 | 12:00PM to 1:00PM
Where

Toronto/Webinar

Presented by:

Dr. Rachel Jug
Transfusion Medicine Physician Trainee
University of Toronto

Objectives:

1. Review the article entitled, “A Randomized Trial of Albumin Infusions in Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis”.
2. Critically appraise article.

Transfusion
When
October 16, 2021 | 8:00AM to October 19, 2021 | 5:00PM
Where

Virtual Conference

The AABB Annual Meeting is the must-attend event to learn about cutting-edge research, keep up with the latest technological advances and network with like-minded professionals from throughout the world.

The AABB Annual Meeting brings together the latest research and practice-changing resources for the fields of blood and biotherapies. Colleagues from throughout the world will come together to connect, network, learn and advance the field.

Click here for additional information.

Transfusion

Blog

Modified on: 
Mar 10, 2021

The Centre for Innovation is delighted to announce the winners of the 2020-2021 Canadian Blood Services Lay Science Writing Competition. Read on to find out who won!

Transfusion

Modified on: 
Mar 3, 2021

You may be aware that there’s no deferral for blood donors after they receive a vaccine against COVID-19. But you might be wondering how the blood operators made this decision. Canadian Blood Services' medical director for donor and clinical services, Dr. Mindy Goldman, answers questions.

Transfusion

Modified on: 
Feb 17, 2021

A study conducted by researchers in the University of Toronto QUEST program, a research collaborative supported by Canadian Blood Services, looked at what can be done to reduce the number of inappropriate red blood cell transfusions in hospitals.

Transfusion