Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Nov 16, 2020

Pre-transfusion testing ensures compatibility between the transfusion patient and the blood component(s) (red blood cells, platelets, plasma) intended for transfusion. This process includes accurate and thorough completion of the requisition, accurate patient identification, proper collection and labelling of the blood sample from the patient, laboratory testing to determine the patient’s blood group and to identify the presence of red blood cell alloantibodies, and compatibility testing. Pre-transfusion testing is complete when a compatible blood component is identified and labelled for transfusion to the intended patient. This chapter provides an overview of the pre-transfusion tests that are routinely performed.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 16, 2020

Background

Originally all plasma fractionation products were derived from pooled human plasma. Increasingly, many plasma proteins are manufactured by biotechnology as recombinant proteins, without need for donated plasma; depending on the plasma protein product, either a recombinant or fractionated product, or both are available in Canada.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 16, 2020

Coagulation factor concentrates are highly effective treatments for patients with hemostatic disorders caused by missing or defective clotting factors. Coagulation factor concentrates may be extracted from pooled donated plasma (plasma-derived) or manufactured using biotechnology (recombinant). In addition, several plasma-derived protein concentrates are available for the treatment of thrombotic disorders and hereditary angioedema.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 16, 2020

This chapter describes when and how to use the plasma protein product albumin and introduces therapeutic alternatives to albumin.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 16, 2020

This first chapter of the Clinical Guide to Transfusion provides an overview of the blood system in Canada, the regulations and standards that are in place and the organizations and professionals that, together, ensure transfusion medicine safety for Canadian patients. 

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 12, 2020

A very small percentage of red blood cell units are manufactured from blood donors with red cell antibodies. These donors may have antibodies directed against common non-ABO antigens detected during routine screening or may represent a rare blood donor with the corresponding antibody. 

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 12, 2020

Authors: Danielle Meunier, MD; Sophia Peng, MD; and Gwen Clarke, MD, FRCPC
Publication date: September 2019
Primary target audiences: Medical laboratory technologists (MLT) in a hospital laboratory, transfusion medicine physicians

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 12, 2020

Authors: Danielle Meunier, MD; Sophia Peng, MD; and Gwen Clarke, MD, FRCPC
Publication date: September 2019
Primary target audiences: Medical laboratory technologists (MLT) in a hospital laboratory, transfusion medicine physicians

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 12, 2020
Authors: Gwen Clarke, MD, FRCPC; Jacqueline Côté, MLT; and Debra Lane, MD, FRCPC
Publication date: October 2019
Primary target audiences: Medical laboratory technologists (MLTs) in a hospital laboratory, transfusion medicine physicians

Key points

  • Anti-M is rarely clinically significant.
  • Patients with anti-M should receive red blood cell units crossmatch compatible by IAT or equivalent using IgG antihuman globulin for transfusion.
Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 12, 2020

Authors: Danielle Meunier, MD; Sophia Peng, MD; and Gwen Clarke, MD, FRCPC
Publication date: September 2019
Primary target audiences: Medical laboratory technologists (MLT) in a hospital laboratory, transfusion medicine physicians

Transfusion

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