Recent Updates

Modified on: 
May 31, 2017

The BloodTechNet program was launched in 2011 to facilitate the development of innovative educational resources that support the Transfusion, Cellular Therapy and Transplantation communities in Canada. The program is led by Canadian Blood Services’ Centre for Innovation with financial support from Grifols. For information about the next BloodTechNet program competition, visit blood.ca research funding programs.

Transfusion
Organs and Tissues
Stem Cells
Modified on: 
May 31, 2017

This chapter focuses on preoperative autologous donation (PAD). There are other types of autologous blood use (e.g. acute normovolemic hemodilution and intraoperative and postoperative blood salvage) which are not discussed in this chapter.

PAD refers to the donation of blood by a patient for his/her own future use; generally this is for a scheduled elective surgery. The top three procedures associated with a request for a PAD are total hip replacement, total knee replacement and hysterectomy.

In most cases, allogeneic blood transfusions are a safe and available option. Autologous and directed donations should be confined to circumstances of rare blood types or plasma protein deficiencies in which  allogeneic units may not meet patient needs. Rare blood types represent only a small number of autologous units collected each year.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
May 8, 2017

By generously providing blood that can be manufactured into red blood cells, platelets and plasma products, whole blood donors are essential to the blood system and the patients it serves. Canadian Blood Services is committed to maintaining a safe and secure blood supply while also protecting the health of our blood donors. The focus of this article is the effect of red blood cell loss on the iron levels of the donor and the steps taken by Canadian Blood Services to protect the health of its donors.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Apr 11, 2017

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but serious syndrome characterized by sudden acute respiratory distress following transfusion. It is defined as new, acute lung injury (ALI) during or within six hours after blood product administration in the absence of temporally-associated risk factors for ALI. 

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Apr 4, 2017

Modified or specialty blood components may be useful in specific clinical settings to reduce the risk of transfusion related harm. Several specialty blood components are available to physicians, including CMV-seronegative, irradiated, and washed red blood cells or platelets. This chapter provides information about these components, describing their preparation and the clinical setting in which they are of greatest benefit.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Apr 3, 2017

This chapter focuses on the principles of safe blood transfusion practices. The aim of this chapter is to develop and support the knowledge of health-care professionals involved in prescribing and administering blood components and products.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Apr 3, 2017

Background

Originally all plasma fractionation products were derived from pooled human plasma. Increasingly, many plasma proteins are manufactured by biotechnology as recombinant proteins, without need of donated plasma; depending on the particular plasma protein product, a recombinant or a fractionated product or both are available in Canada.

This Chapter presents in general terms the various methods and principles by which plasma protein products are manufactured for use in patients. It is complemented by Chapter 3, 4, 5 and 6 of this Guide.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Mar 31, 2017
Transfusion
Modified on: 
Mar 27, 2017

A. Reporting

Attention: All transfusion reactions (mild to life-threatening) and transfusion-related errors must be reported to the hospital’s transfusion service (blood bank).

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Mar 22, 2017

Authors: Sophie Chargé, PhD, and Kendra Hodgkinson, PhD 
Online publication date: January 2017

What is blood?

With every heartbeat, about five litres of blood are pumped through your body.

Blood flows through thousands of kilometres of blood vessels, delivering oxygen and nutrients to the organs and carrying waste products away. Blood also transports cells, hormones and proteins that regulate many body functions, such as fighting infection and controlling blood loss.

Transfusion

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