Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Dec 11, 2017

This chapter focuses on preoperative autologous donation (PAD). There are other types of autologous blood use (e.g. acute normovolemic hemodilution and intraoperative and postoperative blood salvage) which are not discussed in this chapter.

PAD refers to the donation of blood by a patient for his/her own future use; generally this is for a scheduled elective surgery. The top three procedures associated with a request for a PAD are total hip replacement, total knee replacement and hysterectomy.

In most cases, allogeneic blood transfusions are a safe and available option. Autologous and directed donations should be confined to circumstances of rare blood types or plasma protein deficiencies in which  allogeneic units may not meet patient needs. Rare blood types represent only a small number of autologous units collected each year. See Chapter 13 of this Guide for more information on directed donations.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Dec 11, 2017

Pre-transfusion testing refers to the laboratory testing required to ensure compatibility between the blood of the transfusion recipient and the blood product intended for transfusion. This process includes proper completion of the requisition, proper patient identification, collection and labelling of the blood sample from the patient, laboratory testing to determine the patient’s blood group and to identify the presence of red blood cell alloantibodies, and compatibility testing. Pre-transfusion testing is completed when a compatible blood product is identified for transfusion to the intended recipient. This chapter provides an overview of the pre-transfusion tests that are routinely performed.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Dec 11, 2017

All blood transfused in Canada is collected from volunteer donors. To ensure the safety of the blood products, donors are carefully screened against an extended list of eligibility criteria and their donated blood products are tested for transfusion-transmissible diseases. Donor eligibility criteria also reduce potential health risks for the donor. This chapter describes the donor selection process, the pathogen testing done on blood products, and the pathogen inactivation processes that can further reduce the potential risk of transfusion-transmitted diseases.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Dec 11, 2017

This chapter describes the manufacturing process for the most commonly prepared blood products: Red Blood Cells, Pooled Platelets, Frozen Plasma (FP), Apheresis Fresh Frozen Plasma (AFFP), Cryosupernatant Plasma (CSP) and Cryoprecipitate. A brief description of the indications, contraindications, storage and transportation requirements, dose, administration and available alternatives is included in the sections below. Further information may be found in other chapters of this Guide as indicated within the different sections.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Dec 1, 2017

The BloodTechNet program was launched in 2011 to facilitate the development of innovative educational resources that support the Transfusion, Cellular Therapy and Transplantation communities in Canada. The program is led by Canadian Blood Services’ Centre for Innovation with financial support from Grifols. For information about the next BloodTechNet program competition, visit blood.ca research funding programs.

Transfusion
Organs and Tissues
Stem Cells
Modified on: 
Nov 27, 2017

“Paying it Forward: Why we need YOU to give blood" is an article by Dr. Jeannie Callum, a hospital-based transfusion specialist. Here she shares her real-life experience witnessing the impact of blood donation on patient lives. She provides some fascinating insight into blood transfusion, past and present, and emphasizes the need for male donors and why some donors may be safer for patients. This article is also being published in six parts on RED, our Research, Education and Discovery blog.  

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 21, 2017

This chapter focuses on the principles of safe blood transfusion practices. The aim of this chapter is to develop and support the knowledge of health-care professionals involved in prescribing and administering blood components and products.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 17, 2017

Platelets are the smallest of the blood cells, with a diameter of 2–3 µm and no nucleus. Their main function is to mediate primary hemostasis, though they are involved in a number of other processes including primary immunity, tumour progression and inflammation.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 17, 2017

I. General Principles

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 17, 2017

Modified or specialty blood components may be useful in specific clinical settings to reduce the risk of transfusion-related harm. Specialty blood products available to physicians include CMV-seronegative, irradiated, and washed red blood cells or platelets. This chapter describes the preparation of these blood components and the clinical setting in which they are of greatest benefit.

Transfusion

Pages