Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Oct 17, 2017

Platelets are the smallest of the blood cells, with a diameter of 2–3 µm and no nucleus. Their main function is to mediate primary hemostasis, though they are involved in a number of other processes including primary immunity, tumour progression and inflammation.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Oct 12, 2017

“Paying it Forward: Why we need YOU to give blood" is an article by Dr. Jeannie Callum, a hospital-based transfusion specialist. Here she shares her real-life experience witnessing the impact of blood donation on patient lives. She provides some fascinating insight into blood transfusion, past and present, and emphasizes the need for male donors and why some donors may be safer for patients. This article is also being published in six parts on RED, our Research, Education and Discovery blog.  

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Oct 6, 2017

The approach to transfusion in emergent situations varies dramatically depending on the clinical scenario. The primary guiding determinant is the clinician’s assessment of the rapidity of bleeding, the severity of hemorrhage or amount of blood lost, and the clinical stability of the patient. Using the severely injured trauma patient as a case study, this chapter will discuss the principles of massive hemorrhage and resuscitation, with the inclusion of special situations such as obstetrical hemorrhage, where data are available.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Oct 4, 2017

Intravenous Immune Globulin

General Information

Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) products are sterile solutions or lyophilized concentrates of human Immunoglobulin G (IgG) immunoglobulin that have been processed to remove multimers and aggregates of IgG thus allowing for intravenous infusion. The distribution of IgG subclasses is similar to that found in normal plasma. Depending on the method of preparation, some products may contain trace amounts of Immunoglobulin A (IgA) and Immunoglobulin M (IgM).  

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Oct 3, 2017

Pre-transfusion testing refers to the laboratory testing required to ensure compatibility between the blood of the transfusion recipient and the blood product intended for transfusion. This process includes proper completion of the requisition, proper patient identification, collection and labelling of the blood sample from the patient, laboratory testing to determine the patient’s blood group and to identify the presence of red blood cell alloantibodies, and compatibility testing. Pre-transfusion testing is completed when a compatible blood product is identified for transfusion to the intended recipient. This chapter provides an overview of the pre-transfusion tests that are routinely performed.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Oct 3, 2017

All blood transfused in Canada is collected from volunteer donors. To ensure the safety of the blood products, donors are carefully screened against an extended list of eligibility criteria and their donated blood products are tested for transfusion-transmissible diseases. Donor eligibility criteria also reduce potential health risks for the donor. This chapter describes the donor selection process, the pathogen testing done on blood products, and the pathogen inactivation processes that can further reduce the potential risk of transfusion-transmitted diseases.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Sep 26, 2017

We are pleased to provide on a regular basis a Surveillance Report describing infectious disease surveillance that our stakeholders can consult to make evidence-based decisions.

High quality and timely surveillance is key to the safety of the blood supply. This includes monitoring of transmissible disease markers that the blood is tested for (including bacteria), investigation of any reports of possible transfusion transmission, as well as a horizon scan for any new pathogens that may pose a risk now or in the future.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Sep 26, 2017

The short storage period for platelet units results in very challenging inventory management, and many platelet units are discarded.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Sep 25, 2017

Current recommendations of the NAC indicate that the provision of CMV-seronegative and leukoreduced blood products is potentially required only in the setting of intrauterine transfusion. In October 2017, Canadian Blood Services will stop the testing donor blood for anti-CMV antibodies except for a small inventory of blood components tested for the sole purpose of intrauterine transfusion.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Sep 20, 2017

Background

Originally all plasma fractionation products were derived from pooled human plasma. Increasingly, many plasma proteins are manufactured by biotechnology as recombinant proteins, without need of donated plasma; depending on the particular plasma protein product, a recombinant or a fractionated product or both are available in Canada.

This Chapter presents in general terms the various methods and principles by which plasma protein products are manufactured for use in patients. It is complemented by Chapter 3, 4, 5 and 6 of this Guide.

Transfusion

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