Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Jul 20, 2018

This chapter reviews the testing and treatments that are relevant for mothers and their fetuses/infants during pregnancy and postnatally to reduce the risks of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) and of immune thrombocytopenias.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jul 13, 2018

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but serious syndrome characterized by sudden acute respiratory distress following transfusion. It is defined as new, acute lung injury (ALI) during or within six hours after blood product administration in the absence of temporally-associated risk factors for ALI. 

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jul 12, 2018

Author: Mindy Goldman, MD, FRCPC
Online publication date: March 2012, updated July 2018

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jul 12, 2018

The following is a guide for reporting adverse transfusion reactions. It includes links where reporting forms may be found. This guide applies to hospitals in Canada, excluding Quebec.

Why report adverse transfusion events?

It is important that transfusion services report adverse transfusion events because:

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 19, 2018

Canadian Blood Services, Trillium Gift of Life Network and the Canadian National Transplant Research Program worked in collaboration with the Critical Care Canada Forum (CCCF) to host the Deceased Organ Donation Symposium that took place October 3 to October 4, 2017. The program reviewed current clinical practices and advances in the science of organ donation medicine, including emerging topics and evolving research. Videos of the seminars were recorded to provide those unable to attend an opportunity to meet Canadian and international critical care experts in the field of deceased organ donation.

View the 2017 CCCF videos

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

Platelets are the smallest of the blood cells, with a diameter of 2–3 µm and no nucleus. Their main function is to mediate primary hemostasis, though they are involved in a number of other processes including primary immunity, tumour progression and inflammation.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

I. General Principles

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

This chapter focuses on preoperative autologous donation (PAD). There are other types of autologous blood use (e.g. acute normovolemic hemodilution and intraoperative and postoperative blood salvage) which are not discussed in this chapter.

PAD refers to the donation of blood by a patient for his/her own future use; generally this is for a scheduled elective surgery. The top three procedures associated with a request for a PAD are total hip replacement, total knee replacement and hysterectomy.

In most cases, allogeneic blood transfusions are a safe and available option. Autologous and directed donations should be confined to circumstances of rare blood types or plasma protein deficiencies in which  allogeneic units may not meet patient needs. Rare blood types represent only a small number of autologous units collected each year. See Chapter 13 of this Guide for more information on directed donations.

Transfusion

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