Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Apr 17, 2019

Anti-Le, commonly anti-Lea, Leb, or Leab, are antibodies directed to antigens of the Lewis blood group system. The Lewis antigens are glycoproteins that are found on the surface of many cells and secreted in various body fluids. As such, Lewis, along with ABO and H are sometimes referred to as “histo-blood groups,” given the fact they are present on many different tissue types.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Apr 16, 2019

Anti-Kpa is an antibody directed to an antigen of the Kell blood group system. The Kell antigens are located on the red blood cell transmembrane glycoprotein known as CD238, and consist of a large group of 35 antigens. Some of these antigens are highly immunogenic, and after the ABO and Rh blood group systems, they are the most common immunogenic group for red blood cells. However, Anti-Kpa itself is extremely rare.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Apr 15, 2019

The following videos were recorded in partnership with Trillium Gift of Life Network and the Canadian National Transplant Research Program at The Canadian Critical Care Forum between November 6 to 9, 2018. 


Presentation: Threats to the Concept of Brain Death

Presenter: Dr. Brian Kavanagh

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Apr 15, 2019

/sites/msi/files/10880-eng-kpd_brochure.pdfTwo new patient and public education and awareness brochures are now available! View or download What is Living Kidney Paired Donation and Kidney Paired Donation (KPD) Program

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Apr 12, 2019

A. Reporting

Attention: All transfusion reactions (mild to life-threatening) and transfusion-related errors must be reported to the hospital’s transfusion service (blood bank).

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Apr 9, 2019

Webinars Hosted by the Donation Physician Network

Lessons from across the pond
June 6, 2018
Dr. Dale Gardiner
Deputy National Clinical Lead for Organ Donation, UK
Adult Intensive Care Medicine Consultant
 
 
Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Apr 3, 2019

The following is a guide for reporting adverse transfusion reactions. It includes links where reporting forms may be found. This guide applies to hospitals in Canada, excluding Quebec.

Why report adverse transfusion events?

It is important that transfusion services report adverse transfusion events because:

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Apr 2, 2019

Modified or specialty blood components may be useful in specific clinical settings to reduce the risk of transfusion-related harm. Specialty blood products available to physicians include CMV-seronegative, irradiated, and washed red blood cells or platelets. This chapter describes the preparation of these blood components and the clinical setting in which they are of greatest benefit.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Mar 29, 2019

Authors: Gwen Clarke, MD, FRCPC; Jacqueline Côté, MLT; and Debra Lane, MD, FRCPC
Publication date: August 2017, updated September 2018

Background

Anti-M is an antibody directed to an antigen of the MNS blood group system. The M antigen is located on the red blood cell surface glycoprotein known as glycophorin A.

Transfusion

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