Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

Pre-transfusion testing refers to the laboratory testing required to ensure compatibility between the blood of the transfusion recipient and the blood product intended for transfusion. This process includes proper completion of the requisition, proper patient identification, collection and labelling of the blood sample from the patient, laboratory testing to determine the patient’s blood group and to identify the presence of red blood cell alloantibodies, and compatibility testing. Pre-transfusion testing is completed when a compatible blood product is identified for transfusion to the intended recipient. This chapter provides an overview of the pre-transfusion tests that are routinely performed.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

Background

Originally all plasma fractionation products were derived from pooled human plasma. Increasingly, many plasma proteins are manufactured by biotechnology as recombinant proteins, without need of donated plasma; depending on the particular plasma protein product, a recombinant or a fractionated product or both are available in Canada.

This Chapter presents in general terms the various methods and principles by which plasma protein products are manufactured for use in patients. It is complemented by Chapter 3, 4, 5 and 6 of this Guide.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

All blood transfused in Canada is collected from volunteer donors. To ensure the safety of the blood products, donors are carefully screened against an extended list of eligibility criteria and their donated blood products are tested for transfusion-transmissible diseases. Donor eligibility criteria also reduce potential health risks for the donor. This chapter describes the donor selection process, the pathogen testing done on blood products, and the pathogen inactivation processes that can further reduce the potential risk of transfusion-transmitted diseases.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

This chapter describes the manufacturing process for the most commonly prepared blood products: Red Blood Cells, Pooled Platelets, Frozen Plasma (FP), Apheresis Fresh Frozen Plasma (AFFP), Cryosupernatant Plasma (CSP) and Cryoprecipitate. A brief description of the indications, contraindications, storage and transportation requirements, dose, administration and available alternatives is included in the sections below. Further information may be found in other chapters of this Guide as indicated within the different sections.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

Canadian Blood System Overview

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 1, 2018

Read about Canadian Blood Services’ recently published Organ Donation and Transplantation 2016 System Progress Report Update and the Donation and Transplantation Interprovincial Programs Report 2009-2016 to find out more about Canada’s donation and transplantation activities.

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
May 30, 2018

Highly Sensitized Patient (HSP) Program Introduction

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
May 30, 2018

Launched in June 2012, the National Organ Waitlist (NOW) provides 24/7 web-based access for non-renal organ transplant programs across the country to list patients in need of a heart, lungs, liver, pancreas, small bowel, or multi-organ transplant. When organs become available, Organ Donation Organizations (ODOs) can access NOW online from the Canadian Transplant Registry (CTR). ODOs use NOW as a first step in the organ allocation process to identify patients in most critical need of an organ anywhere in Canada.

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Apr 25, 2018

ODTEAC provides expert advice on donation and transplantation system activities for ongoing advancement and implementation of national initiatives in partnership with Canadian Blood Services.

Members Organization
CHAIR
Dr. Norman Kneteman

University of Alberta Hospital, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, Alberta

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Apr 23, 2018

Reviews: Bioburden Reduction and Control in Tissue Banking

Canadian Blood Services, in collaboration with national and international community leaders and experts,  has been facilitating the development of evidence based Leading Practice Guidelines in Bioburden Reduction and Control in tissue banking. The foundation of this work has been the collection and evaluation of evidence in five key areas of tissue recovery and allograft production through systematic reviews of the published literature.  The results of these systematic reviews have been published in the Journal of Cell and Tissue Banking.

Organs and Tissues

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