Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Aug 1, 2018

Apheresis involves the removal of whole blood from an individual and its separation into components. A specified component is retained and the remainder is returned to the individual. Therapeutic apheresis is used to treat patients with a variety of disorders and has become a relatively common treatment modality. The rationale and techniques for therapeutic apheresis, as well as the care of the apheresis patient, will be discussed in this chapter.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jul 27, 2018

Labile blood components, i.e. those blood components collected, produced and distributed by Canadian blood suppliers, are a vital resource supporting health care in Canada. The supply of these resources could be compromised by a number of external threats that may include but are not limited to, labour disruptions, endemic disease outbreaks, extreme weather disturbances or disruptions in transportation systems. In times of severe shortages, the allocation of blood components could present a significant challenge to the provision of health care.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jul 12, 2018

The following is a guide for reporting adverse transfusion reactions. It includes links where reporting forms may be found. This guide applies to hospitals in Canada, excluding Quebec.

Why report adverse transfusion events?

It is important that transfusion services report adverse transfusion events because:

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 19, 2018

Canadian Blood Services, Trillium Gift of Life Network and the Canadian National Transplant Research Program worked in collaboration with the Critical Care Canada Forum (CCCF) to host the Deceased Organ Donation Symposium that took place October 3 to October 4, 2017. The program reviewed current clinical practices and advances in the science of organ donation medicine, including emerging topics and evolving research. Videos of the seminars were recorded to provide those unable to attend an opportunity to meet Canadian and international critical care experts in the field of deceased organ donation.

View the 2017 CCCF videos

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

This chapter focuses on preoperative autologous donation (PAD). There are other types of autologous blood use (e.g. acute normovolemic hemodilution and intraoperative and postoperative blood salvage) which are not discussed in this chapter.

PAD refers to the donation of blood by a patient for his/her own future use; generally this is for a scheduled elective surgery. The top three procedures associated with a request for a PAD are total hip replacement, total knee replacement and hysterectomy.

In most cases, allogeneic blood transfusions are a safe and available option. Autologous and directed donations should be confined to circumstances of rare blood types or plasma protein deficiencies in which  allogeneic units may not meet patient needs. Rare blood types represent only a small number of autologous units collected each year. See Chapter 13 of this Guide for more information on directed donations.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

Modified or specialty blood components may be useful in specific clinical settings to reduce the risk of transfusion-related harm. Specialty blood products available to physicians include CMV-seronegative, irradiated, and washed red blood cells or platelets. This chapter describes the preparation of these blood components and the clinical setting in which they are of greatest benefit.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

While the practice of transfusion of blood products to neonatal and pediatric recipients has much in common with the transfusion of blood products to adults, there are several important differences and special circumstances. This chapter highlights the most common considerations that are unique to this group of patients.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

A. Reporting

Attention: All transfusion reactions (mild to life-threatening) and transfusion-related errors must be reported to the hospital’s transfusion service (blood bank).

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jun 8, 2018

This chapter focuses on the principles of safe blood transfusion practices. The aim of this chapter is to develop and support the knowledge of health-care professionals involved in prescribing and administering blood components and products.

Transfusion

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