Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

Pre-transfusion testing refers to the laboratory testing required to ensure compatibility between the blood of the transfusion recipient and the blood product intended for transfusion. This process includes proper completion of the requisition, proper patient identification, collection and labelling of the blood sample from the patient, laboratory testing to determine the patient’s blood group and to identify the presence of red blood cell alloantibodies, and compatibility testing. Pre-transfusion testing is completed when a compatible blood product is identified for transfusion to the intended recipient. This chapter provides an overview of the pre-transfusion tests that are routinely performed.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

Coagulation factor concentrates are highly effective treatments for patients with hemostatic disorders caused by missing or defective clotting factors. Coagulation factor concentrates may be extracted from pooled donated plasma (plasma-derived) or manufactured using biotechnology (recombinant). In addition, several plasma-derived protein concentrates are available for the treatment of thrombotic disorders and hereditary angioedema.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

This chapter describes when and how to use the plasma protein product albumin and introduces therapeutic alternatives to albumin.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

This chapter describes the manufacturing process for the most commonly prepared blood products: Red Blood Cells, Pooled Platelets, Frozen Plasma (FP), Apheresis Fresh Frozen Plasma (AFFP), Cryosupernatant Plasma (CSP) and Cryoprecipitate. A brief description of the indications, contraindications, storage and transportation requirements, dose, administration and available alternatives is included in the sections below. Further information may be found in other chapters of this Guide as indicated within the different sections.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 6, 2019

This chapter reviews the testing and treatments that are relevant for mothers and their fetuses/infants during pregnancy and postnatally to reduce the risks of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) and of immune thrombocytopenias.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 5, 2019

By generously providing blood that can be manufactured into red blood cells, platelets and plasma products, whole blood donors are essential to the blood system and the patients it serves. Canadian Blood Services is committed to maintaining a safe and secure blood supply while also protecting the health of our blood donors. The focus of this article is the effect of red blood cell loss on the iron levels of the donor and the steps taken by Canadian Blood Services to protect the health of its donors.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 4, 2019

Authors: Sandra Ramirez-Arcos, PhD, Mariam Taha, PhD, Yuntong Kou, MSc, and Mindy Goldman, MD, FRCPC
Online publication date: February 2017

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jan 29, 2019

Labile blood components, i.e. those blood components collected, produced and distributed by Canadian blood suppliers, are a vital resource supporting health care in Canada. The supply of these resources could be compromised by a number of external threats that may include but are not limited to, labour disruptions, endemic disease outbreaks, extreme weather disturbances or disruptions in transportation systems. In times of severe shortages, the allocation of blood components could present a significant challenge to the provision of health care.

Transfusion

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