Blog

Modified on: 
Jan 22, 2020

Although it doesn’t happen often, sometimes patients will have a bad reaction during or after a blood transfusion. Surveillance systems set up to monitor the safety of the blood supply in Canada keep track of incidents like these so that issues potentially affecting patient safety can be identified. A recently published guide on reporting adverse transfusion events, available on Canadian Blood Services’ professional education website, helps make the reporting process easier to understand.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Jan 6, 2020

Welcome to 2020! Take a look back with us by checking out the five most visited R.E.D. blog posts in 2019.

Stem Cells
Transfusion
Modified on: 
Dec 22, 2019

When doctors select compatible red blood cell units for transfusion into a patient, they don’t consider the sex of the patient and whether the donor is the same (sex-matched) or opposite sex (sex-mismatched). But a study led by Dr. Michelle Zeller, Canadian Blood Services medical officer and assistant professor in the department of medicine at McMaster University, suggests that the role of donor sex in red blood cell compatibility may be worth a closer look.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Dec 18, 2019

On Nov. 13, 2019, the Centre for Blood Research hosted the 13th annual Earl W. Davie Symposium in Vancouver, BC. This symposium brings together world-class researchers, eager trainees, and a giant in the world of blood coagulation – Dr. Earl W. Davie himself.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Dec 9, 2019

When a patient has unexpected red blood cell antibodies (non-ABO) in their blood, selecting compatible red blood cell donor units for transfusion is critical. New serological best practices for health-care providers, available on Canadian Blood Service’s professional education website, help ensure patients receive red blood cell units that are the best match for them.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Dec 4, 2019

The Canadian Blood Services Centre for Innovation has been doing research to develop a “new” product for transfusion that some might find surprising: whole blood! Yes, the fluid that is originally drawn from a donor. To learn why, we need to delve into the history of blood transfusion and innovation over the past century.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 28, 2019

The Centre for Innovation supports research, innovation and education in key areas in blood, plasma, stem cells, and organs and tissues. This support is in part through the many competitive funding programs centre administers. These are open to Canadian researchers interested in pursuing projects focused on Canadian Blood Services priorities. Read on to learn about the recent recipients of funding through our Postdoctoral Fellowship Program and our Blood Efficiency Accelerator Award Program.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 13, 2019

The AABB Annual Meeting is a must-attend event for those in the fields of transfusion medicine and cellular therapies. AABB 2019 took place last month in San Antonio, Texas. Canadian Blood Services trainees Dr. Narges Hadjesfandiari and Dr. Olga Mykhailova were there and report back on meeting highlights.

Stem Cells
Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 6, 2019

Last month, Dr. Donald Branch, a scientist at Canadian Blood Services’ Centre for Innovation and professor at the University of Toronto, received a prestigious international award honouring his more than 40 years of major contributions to transfusion medicine and hematology.

Stem Cells
Transfusion
Modified on: 
Oct 30, 2019

Drinking the blood of the young, and thereby somehow capturing their youth, is a common literary trope. The ghoulish notion speaks to our cultural fascination with youth, but also to our dread of aging.

There’s no evidence-based therapy using the blood of young people to counteract or prevent the effects of aging, but young blood is an area where science might be beginning to imitate art — at least, sort of.

Transfusion

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