Blog

Modified on: 
Mar 2, 2017

In the e_rly d_ys of tr_nsfusi_n medicine, d_ct_rs g_ve p_tients _ll s_rts _f different fluids, including _l__d _r milk fr_m _nim_ls. Success v_ried, _nd the results were _ften dis_str_us—even when they used hum_n _l__d. 

Modified on: 
Aug 16, 2016

This post is based on a ResearchUnit originally gathered in April 2016. ResearchUnits summarize recent scientific publications. They are produced and distributed by Canadian Blood Services’ Centre for Innovation.

There are public health concerns around the use of DEHP in blood bags, particularly for pediatric patients. This study shows a less toxic compound called DINCH may be a viable alternative.

Modified on: 
Aug 16, 2016

For this instalment of "meet the researcher" we caught up with Dr. William Sheffield a senior scientist with Canadian Blood Services' Centre for Innovation. 

Modified on: 
Aug 16, 2016

“It’s a Canadian tradition to push blood as far forward as possible in the safest possible way.”

There’s a long, rich history of military blood transfusion and Canadians have been at the front and centre of this field since WWI.

Getting blood where it’s most needed is a challenge at the best of times, but getting it to soldiers injured in combat is an extraordinary feat.

Modified on: 
Mar 2, 2017

The 2016 Transfusion Science Education Course – a Canadian Blood Services, Grifols partnership.

 

Modified on: 
Aug 16, 2016

While blood transfusion is safer now than ever before, scientists continue to look for ways to reduce risk and ensure the healthiest possible outcomes for patients.

A unique collaboration between Canadian Blood Services, The Ottawa Hospital and Université Laval has led to some interesting and somewhat unexpected findings that open the door to new areas of research in transfusion medicine.

Modified on: 
Sep 19, 2016

Dr. Peter Nickerson awarded the AST Clinical Science Established Investigator Award.

Modified on: 
Mar 2, 2017

Dr. Sheila O’Brien knows the answer. She is the associate director, epidemiology and surveillance, working at Canadian Blood Services head office in Ottawa. Understanding and minimizing the infectious risks associated with blood transfusion is what she does each and every day.

Modified on: 
Jun 28, 2016

On June 9, The Ottawa Hospital announced an exciting breakthrough treatment for some MS patients. The clinical trial, supported by our autologous stem cell program, was just published in The Lancet and has received world-wide media attention. 

Modified on: 
Sep 19, 2016

A new innovation by a team of Canadian Blood Services researchers and the National HLA Advisory Committee has improved the situation for Canadian transplant patients.

By Jenny Ryan

Launched in April 2012, the Canadian cPRA Calculator was developed to support Canadian Blood Services’ transplant programs. It’s a web-based application used by the entire Canadian transplant community to estimate the percentage of Canadian organ donors with whom a transplant candidate may be incompatible. 

Pages